Types of Ornamental Features for Balustrades

Balustrades example

Several decisions will go into the designing of commercial space. One of the key ones is choosing a design that will maximize your land use. The best solution for this is a multi-story building. Even so, some mistakes will see you end up with minimal floor space, even with the many rooms you will have. The primary error in this instance is picking the wrong staircase design. This is one that takes up too much valuable floor space.

Getting a balance between a functional office staircase design and one that takes minimal floor space is no doubt daunting. With the right contractor, however, you can get guidance on what will work best for your space. The contractor will also guide you on some ornamental features for your staircase’s balustrades so that the stairs become an architectural masterpiece rather than simple, functional structures. The term ‘balustrade’ refers to handrails, newels, and spindles designed to boost your stairs’ safety by keeping people on the stairs. Here are a few features the stair contractor might suggest.

Volutes

These are decorative curls at the ends of handrails. The volute is generally used on the lowest step over a curtail that generates the needed “space” for the twist. When used with a curtail, the volute will not be a simple decorative feature. It also generates extra strength for your handrail and allows you to include more spindles to the balustrade. This way, you will have a sturdier handrail than when using one newel post. You can alternatively opt for a turnout that resembles a half-curl volute.

Gooseneck

The gooseneck is often found on the higher steps of a staircase. It is formed when a high handrail is joined to a sloped one using a perpendicular turn. The gooseneck is usually used when you have a return balustrade {on balcony or landing} that is higher compared to the rake {on the staircase} and should be joined using a continuous rail.

Easings

These are the vertical turns of your handrail. Easings are typically used on bars that will be fixed to a wall instead of the balustrade. Even so, they can be used on balustrades as part of their gooseneck. An up-easing or up-ramp is a concave turn. It is often used at the part where your handrails flatten, such as around the gooseneck or the lowest part of the stairs. The overhead easing, on the other hand, is convex and often used where your stairs meet the landing.

Rosette

Spacious corridor with stairs

At times your stairs’ handrail ends in a wall and does not have a newel post. In this case, a rosette is used to protect your walls. It will avert the tearing of your wall by the force placed on the handrail. Rosettes come in several designs to add decorative details to your stairs.

Turning your staircase into a design element for your interiors does not mean overdoing it with embellishments. The above options are sure to leave you with stairs that will enhance your indoor look. Even so, check your local building regulations to ensure their use is allowed in your locality.

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